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Partnership of a European Group of Aeronautics and Space Universities

Partnership of a European Group of Aeronautics and Space UniversitieS is the biggest network for aeronautical and space universities in Europe. It has been created in 1998 by the French National aeronautical universities. The European manufacture ...

                                               

American Society of Civil Engineers

The American Society of Civil Engineers founded on November 5, 1852 to represent members of the civil engineering profession worldwide is the oldest national engineering society in the United States. Its world headquarters is in Reston, Virginia.

                                               

Arch bridge

An arch bridge is a bridge with abutments at each end shaped as a curved arch. Arch bridges work by transferring the weight of the bridge and its loads partially into a horizontal thrust held by the abutments at either side. A viaduct may be made ...

                                               

Building

Building may be a noun or a verb. Building is one of the most ancient human skills. It is part of how we have survived and it is the clearest symbol of every civilization. Although some other animals build simple structures, e.g. birds, ants and ...

                                               

United States Army Corps of Engineers

The United States Army Corps of Engineers is a U.S. federal agency under the Department of Defense. It is a major Army command made up of some 36.500 civilian and military personnel. Although generally associated with dams, canals and Flood contr ...

                                               

Materials science

Materials science studies the properties of matter to solve science and engineering problems. It uses applied physics and chemistry. Supersmall nanotechnology has got attention in recent years. There are many inventions of new material. Work on w ...

                                               

Beamline

In particle physics, a beamline is the path in a particle accelerator of the particles. In materials science, physics, chemistry, and molecular biology a beamline leads to the experimental endstation utilizing particle beams from a particle accel ...

                                               

Carbon fiber reinforced plastic

Carbon fiber reinforced plastic, is a very strong, light and expensive composite material or fiber-reinforced plastic. Similar to glass-reinforced plastic, one uses commonly the name of its reinforcing fibers for the composite material. The plast ...

                                               

Deformation

In engineering mechanics, deformation is a change in shape that is result of a force that influences the object. It can be a result of tensile pulling forces, compressive pushing forces, shear, bending or torsion twisting.

                                               

Differential scanning calorimeter

Differential scanning calorimetry, is an analysis tool widely used in materials sciences, thermochemistry, drug purity and food quality testing. Its speed and ease of operation give instant information about the thermodynamic characteristics that ...

                                               

Ductility

Ductility is when a solid material stretches under tensile strain. If ductile, a material may be stretched into a wire. Malleability, a similar property, is a materials ability to deform under pressure. If malleable, a material may be flattened b ...

                                               

Elastic modulus

An elastic modulus, or modulus of elasticity, is the mathematical description of an object or substances tendency to be deformed elastically when a force is applied to it. The elastic modulus of an object is defined as the slope of its stress-str ...

                                               

Fibreglass

Fibreglass is a composite material. It is a fibre-reinforced polymer made of a plastic reinforced by fine fibres made of glass. The composite material may be called glass-reinforced plastic. Fibreglass is cheaper and more flexible than carbon fib ...

                                               

Polymorphism (materials science)

In materials science, polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one form or crystal structure. Polymorphism can be found in any crystalline material including polymers, minerals, and metals. It is related to allotropy, ...

                                               

Shearography

Shearography is a method used to test if something is broken on the inside, where people cannot see. Things that can be tested with shearography are airplane wings, wind turbine generator blades, boats, and other structures. A special camera is u ...

                                               

Tensile strength

Tensile strength is a measurement of the force required to pull something such as rope, wire, or a structural beam to the point where it breaks. The tensile strength of a material is the maximum amount of tensile stress that it can take before fa ...

                                               

Wear (erosion)

In materials science, wear is the erosion of material from a solid surface by the action of another solid. The study of the processes of wear is part of the discipline of tribology. There are four principal wear processes: Abrasive wear Corrosive ...

                                               

Amplitude

The amplitude or peak amplitude of a wave is a measure of how big its oscillation is. Amplitudes are always measured as positive numbers for example: 3.5, 1, 120 and are never negative for example: -3.5, -1, -120. Thats because distance can only ...

                                               

Frequency

Frequency is how often an event repeats itself over a set amount of time. In physics, the frequency of a wave is the number of wave crests that pass a point in one second a wave crest is the peak of the wave. Hertz symbol Hz is the unit of freque ...

                                               

Period (physics)

A time period is the time taken for one complete cycle of vibration to pass a given point. As the frequency of a wave increases, the time period of the wave decreases. The unit for time period is seconds. Frequency and time period are in a recipr ...

                                               

Vibration control

In earthquake engineering, vibration control is a set of technical means for decreasing seismic loads and improving seismic performance of building structures.

                                               

Vibration isolation

Vibration isolation is a system of devices to decouple a mechanical or structural object from its vibrating supports. For example, the handles of the saw presented in the right photo are separated from the engine and cutting bar to reduce shaking ...

                                               

Wavelength

A wavelength is the length of the shortest repeating part of a "sine wave". All waves can be formed by adding up sine waves. That is, every wave is a total of sine waves, which may be identified by Fourier analysis.

                                               

Mechanics

Mechanics is a branch of physics which looks at objects that are moved by forces. The discipline has its roots in ancient Greece where Aristotle studied the way bodies behaved when they were thrown through the air e.g. a stone. However it was Gal ...

                                               

Acceleration

Acceleration is a measure of how fast velocity changes. Acceleration is the change of velocity divided by the change of time. Acceleration is a vector, and therefore includes both a size and a direction. Acceleration is also a change in speed and ...

                                               

Angular frequency

In physics, angular frequency. ω. is a measure of rotation rate. A high rate of angular frequency means something is turning very fast. The angular frequency is the magnitude of the vector quantity angular velocity which is also known asangular f ...

                                               

Angular momentum

The angular momentum or rotational momentum of an object rotating about an axis is the product of its moment of inertia and its angular velocity: L = I ω {\displaystyle L=I\omega } where I {\displaystyle I} is the moment of inertia resistance to ...

                                               

Angular velocity

In physics, the angular velocity specifies the angular speed at which an object is rotating along with the direction in which it is rotating. It is a vector quantity. The SI unit of angular velocity is radians per second. But it may be measured i ...

                                               

Applied mechanics

Applied mechanics, also known as theoretical and applied mechanics, is a branch of the physical sciences and the practical application of mechanics. Applied mechanics examines the response of bodies to external forces. Some examples of mechanical ...

                                               

Buoyancy

In physics, buoyancy is a force on an object making that object rise or move upward. It comes from the Spanish word for "float", boyar. Buoyancy is made by the difference in pressure put on the object by the Fluid or air that the object is in. Th ...

                                               

Centrifugal force

This is the force that acts on the body in a direction away from the centre, which contributes to making the body try to fly away. When you hold a rope with a heavy object attached to it, and rotate it around, the rope becomes tight and keeps the ...

                                               

Centripetal force

Centripetal force is an accelerating force that acts on any body that revolves around a centre. This force contributes to keeping the body in rotation. This force is always directed towards the centre. The opposite force by Isaac Newtons third la ...

                                               

Classical mechanics

Classical mechanics is the part of physics that describes how everyday things move and how their motion changes because of forces. If we know how things are moving now, classical mechanics allows us to predict how they will move in the future and ...

                                               

Collision

A collision occurs when two objects come in contact with each other. All collisions have the same momentum before and after a collision. Examples of collisions include car crashes, bouncing a ball, and playing pool. Collisions are made from two s ...

                                               

Gravitational energy

Gravitational energy is the potential energy held by an object because of its high position compared to a lower position. In other words, it is energy associated with gravity or gravitational force. For example, a pen being held above a table has ...

                                               

Hamiltonian mechanics

Hamiltonian mechanics is a mathematical way of understanding the way something mechanical will behave. It was invented in 1833 by Irish mathematician William Rowan Hamilton. The value of the Hamiltonian is the total energy of the thing being desc ...

                                               

Hookes law

It is a law of mechanics and physics discovered by Robert Hooke. This theory of elasticity says the extension of a spring is proportional to the load applied to it. Many materials obey this law as long as the load does not exceed the materials el ...

                                               

Impulse (physics)

In classical mechanics, an impulse is defined as the integral of a force with respect to time: I = ∫ F d t {\displaystyle \mathbf {I} =\int \mathbf {F} \,dt} where I is impulse sometimes marked J, F is the force, and dt shows it is with respect t ...

                                               

Inertia

Inertia is the resistance of the object to any change in its motion, including a change in direction. An object will stay still or keep moving at the same speed and in a straight line, unless it is acted upon by an external unbalanced force. For ...

                                               

Internal energy

In thermodynamics, the internal energy of a thermodynamic system, or a body with well-defined boundaries, denoted by U, or sometimes E, is the total of the kinetic energy due to the motion of molecules and the potential energy associated with the ...

                                               

Jerk

Jerk is the change in the acceleration of an object. Mathematically, jerk is the derivative, or the rate of change of acceleration by time. Jerk is also called jolt, surge, or lurch. Jerk is a vector and there is no word for its scalar value. The ...

                                               

Kinematics

Kinematics is the branch of classical mechanics which describes the motion of points, bodies and systems of bodies without looking at the cause of this motion. The term was translated from French; A.M. Ampere used the term cinematique. He constru ...

                                               

Kinetic energy

Kinetic energy is the energy that an object has because of its motion. This energy can be converted into other kinds, such as gravitational or electric potential energy, which is the energy that an object has because of its position in a gravitat ...

                                               

Mass

The mass of an object is a measure of the amount of matter in a body. A mountain has typically more mass than a rock, for instance. Mass should not be confused with the related but quite different concept of weight. We can measure the mass of an ...

                                               

Mechanical advantage

Mechanical advantage is the factor by which a machine multiplies force. The mechanical advantage of a machine can be used to find out how well a machine works and whether it can perform a particular job. The mechanical advantage of a machine is t ...

                                               

Mechanical energy

In physics, mechanical energy describes the potential energy and kinetic energy present in the components of a mechanical system. When a given amount of mechanical energy is transferred it is said that this amount of mechanical work has been done ...

                                               

Moment of inertia

Moment of inertia, also called angular mass ", is the inertia of a rotating body with respect to its rotation. It is a rotating bodys resistance to angular acceleration or deceleration, equal to the product of the mass and the square of its perpe ...

                                               

Momentum

Linear momentum, translational momentum or simply momentum is the product of a bodys mass and its velocity: p = m v {\displaystyle \mathbf {p} =m\mathbf {v} } where p is the momentum, m is the mass and v is the velocity. Momentum can be thought o ...

                                               

Movement

Movement, or motion, is the state of changing somethings position - that is, changing where something is. A flying bird or a walking person are moving, because they change where they are from one place to another. There are many kinds of science ...

                                               

Newtons law of universal gravitation

Newtons universal law of gravitation is a physical law that describes the attraction between two objects with mass. It is talked about in Isaac Newtons Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica. The law is part of classical mechanics. The form ...